La Monte Superior Alto Sax On eBay

I found an interesting horn for sale in an eBay store yesterday. The sax is a La Monte Superior alto.

The seller describes the horn as follows:

ALTO LA MONTE Superior ALTO SAX
sERIAL NUMBER F 4536 DATES TO 1960′S (I BELIEVE)
IT IS IN VERY NICE CONDITION WITH GOOD PADS AND FINISH IS AS SHOWN.
THERE ARE SCRATCHES AS SHONW AND A FEW SMALL DINGS ON BOTTOM AND BELL
THIS IS A STENCIL HORN FROM THE ORSI COMPANY IN ITALY
THIS ITALIAN MADE HORN PLAYS WELL AND COMES WITH THE CASE AND NO MOUTHPIECE

Despite the horn having a few dings, scratches, and an obviously bent key guard, it looks to be in decent shape.

This La Monte Superior appears to be an Orsi stencil of their professional model 116 AB  saxophone.

professional-alto-tenor

I’ve never played any of the Orsi professional model saxophones, so can’t speak to their quality vis-à-vis the French or German horns of the same time frame. If you can, I’d be curious to hear your thoughts on the pro model Orsi saxes.

Because this sax is in an eBay store, there is no auction closing date. The Buy It Now price for this La Monte Superior is $175.00.

…this is just my blog. My “real” website is www.bassic-sax.info. If you’re looking for sax info, you should check it out too.There’s lots there!

© 2009, Helen. All rights reserved.


Comments

La Monte Superior Alto Sax On eBay — 5 Comments

  1. This LaMonte Superior sold for $145.00. :shock:

    Compared to some of the other LaMonte altos that have sold recently, I’d say the new owner got themselves a pretty nice little horn for a decent price.

  2. Our high school marching band was never very big — we usually had 60-75 people, where schools nearby would march 200-piece bands — but we were winning a lot of 1competitions. Also, for cost reasons we would generally only participate in events that had both a parade and a field show on the same day. (This has since become the norm.) The bands we fielded looked very different even though they were the same people.

    Parades were always in the morning or early afternoon. For this we would march a typically-composed military band, with a full complement of flutes, clarinets, saxophones, etc. because those CAN be heard when marching right past a judging stand.

    For the field shows, all the people playing flutes and clarinets in the morning were expected to play something louder or something immobile (pit percussion). Those who didn’t want to be too adventurous played saxophones. We had very few mellophones because the herd of alto saxophones helped cover that hole, and we needed them elsewhere. The tenor saxophones just reinforced the low brass.

    Not terribly surprisingly, this has also become the norm. Many field marching bands have gone to a composition as close as practical to a drum and bugle corps, because every one of those players can be heard. We were just a bit ahead of the curve.

    We also won drum line competitions even though we didn’t actually HAVE a drum line. We’d put all the actual drummers (which numbered eight or nine) on snare or tenor drums, and flesh out the cymbals, bass drums, and pit percussion with people who normally played winds. By cherry-picking the best musicians and asking them to play two or three different instruments during the course of a day, we always managed to sound much larger than we actually were.

    This did put pressure on our stock of school instruments, of course. I had my own clarinet, but was reliant on school instruments for saxophones, trumpet, mellophone, and mallet percussion. The saxophones were mostly Bundy, and I remember them as chronically sucking, but I’m sure this was more affected by maintenance (or a lack thereof) than a quality inherent to the instruments.

    Saxophones will be heard in a marching band if there is a niche where they aren’t drowned out — like our alto section.

    • You are right of course, the lower volume instruments can be heard when they march by the judging stand. But really that’s the only time it comes into play. I wasn’t thinking about part of the competition, I was only thinking of the field events.

      I think there is something very spectacular about these massive marching bands. I personally love watching and listening to them. I just am very sad when I think about how many really fine instruments have been destroyed, when crappy horns would have sufficed. They would have gotten the job done equally well.

  3. It looks nice but for some lacquer flaking off the bow. I would snap it up except that I don’t need another alto with the pinky table axles on the wrong side. I already have the Aristocrat (Bundy by another name). I waive this rule for C-melody instruments, and would waive it for something known to be good enough to compensate for the design flaw (say, a Big B), but not for just another horn in the collection.

    I would recommend this to anyone who wants a marching horn though, it should hold up just fine for that sort of duty and sound good in the process.

    • You can march with any old P.O.S. :twisted: Old student model horns are perfectly good for that kind of thing. Sounding good is not a necessity. No one can hear you anyway. You’re just part of a wall of sound.

      I realize that down south of the border marching bands are an institution, and expensive horns are routinely used in all kinds of bands from high school to college. (A couple of my horns are veterans of just such abuse.)

      I played in marching bands when I was a teenager and in university. At the time my sax teachers & professors would have shot me if I used either my Super 20 or my Mark VI for marching band. At the time I was playing with an award winning marching band. The Beefeaters traveled extensively, and were renowned, but that didn’t matter. Marching was still marching, regardless under whose name you did it.

      Reality is, as a sax player in a marching band, you might be louder than the clarinets, but the trumpets and other brass will freakin’ blow you out of the water every time anyway. Not to mention the drums, and other loud percussion instruments…

      Why scratch up pro horns on fancy uniform buttons; ruin pads in the rain; and expose your expensive sax to all kinds of possible damage? All for the sake of playing in a band in which your sound is just swallowed up in anyway?

      Nope, that’s really what old clunkers are good for. It’s been my personal experience that some leaking is not necessarily problematic, since subtoning is not a requirement… Nor is playing overly softly. :devil2:

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