An Impala Tenor Saxophone, But Not By D&J

A couple of days ago I received an email from a fellow who asked me about an Impala tenor saxophone on the German eBay site. At first blush it looked a bit like a Max Keilwerth horn, but upon closer inspection, not so much.

sax in case, Impala tenor saxophone, silver sax, Vintage East German sax, stencil of Weltklang sax, DDR

Source: ars musica münchen on eBay.de

The more I looked at it, the more it screamed: WELTKLANG! It just had too many features that looked like certain tenors built by the VEB Blechblas- und Signal-Instrumenten-Fabrik, and not enough features of a Max or Julius Keilwerth-made instrument. (BTW, all the previous Impala saxophones that I have seen have been Dörfler & Jörka stencil horns.)

This Impala tenor has a very distinctive neck guard with the serial number stamped on the right side. This is a feature found on most of the 1960 tenor Weltklang tenors.

saxophone neck, tenor sax neck, goose neck, Impala tenor saxophone, stencil of Weltklang sax, vintage, East German sax, DDR

Source: ars musica münchen on eBay.de

Even the butterfly wing neck fastening screw is what was originally seen on the Weltklang horns.

This Impala tenor’s engraving also bears a strong resemblance in location and style to that of the earliest Weltklang saxophones.

tenor sax, Impala tenor saxophone, vintage, East German sax, DDR, stencil of Weltklang saxophone

Source: ars musica münchen on eBay.de

The left pinkie cluster is yet another feature that indicates this Impala tenor’s Weltklang pedigree.

silver saxophone, Impala tenor saxophone, stencil of Weltklang sax, vintage East German sax, DDR,

Source: ars musica münchen on eBay.de

And finally, the key guards, shape of the right pinkie keys, and low C mechanism all point towards this Impala tenor’s Weltklang origins.

silver saxophone, Impala tenor saxophone, stencil of Weltklang sax, vintage East German sax, DDR,

Source: ars musica münchen on eBay.de

The seller of this VEB Blechblas- und Signal-Instrumenten-Fabrik-made, Impala tenor saxophone describe like this:

Sie bieten auf ein schönes, altes, gut erhaltenes Impala Tenorsaxophon. Es wurde in der Meisterwerkstatt neu überholt bzw. restauriert wie man auf den Bildern erkennen kann. Es hat kaum Gebrauchsspuren und schon gar keine gravierende Mängel. Das Saxophon lässt sich schön und leicht spielen. Das Saxophon hat die Seriennummer 10687. Sie bekommen das Saxophon im Koffer.

Helen translate says…

You are bidding on a nice, old, well maintained Impala tenor saxophone. As you can see in the photos, it was overhauled/restored in a master craftsman’s workshop. It has hardly an signs of use, and no serious faults. The sax plays nice and easily. It has the serial number 10687. You receive the saxophone in a case.

Here are the last few photos, of this Weltklang-stencilled Impala tenor.

Source: ars musica münchen on eBay.de

I coincidentally happen to have a Weltklang tenor in Bassic Sax Pix, that is only a few hundred serial numbers away from this Impala tenor. Check out Weltklang tenor # 10322. This horn appears to be identical to the Impala tenor currently for sale on the German eBay site.

Impala certainly isn’t the only company that their saxophones stencilled by both West and East German companies. For example, Luxor had the Weltklang model stencilled for them under the Luxor name, while the Luxor Van Hall was stencilled by the Julius Keilwerth Company. Furthermore, the Luxor Solo originated from the Romanian company Arta Guban.

If you’ve always wanted a Weltklang tenor, then this might be an option for you. The seller is willing to ship worldwide. That said, European prices are higher than North American ones, and this Impala tenor saxophone is no exception.

This stencil of a Weltklang is currently listed on the German eBay site for the Buy It Now price of €790.00. XE.com currently estimates that to be $1,077.23 US. The seller is open to offers though. So far no one has made any.

The auction for this VEB Blechblas- und Signal-Instrumenten-Fabrik-made Impala tenor saxophone is scheduled to end on March 8—unless it gets scooped up at the BIN price.

If you’d like to read more about Weltklang saxophones, you can check out the page about the brand on my website.

…this is just my blog. My “real” website is www.bassic-sax.info. If you’re looking for sax info, you should check it out too.There’s lots there!

Carl Schiller: Yet Another D&J Stencil Name

This entry is part 30 of 30 in the series Dörfler & Jörka Saxophones

Lately I haven’t seen much in eBay’s vintage saxophone listings that have been particularly interesting. That is, until today. This morning I happened across another Dörfler & Jörka stencil name that I hadn’t seen before: a Carl Schiller tenor saxophone.

Dörfler & Jörka, Carl Schiller,  saxophone bell, bell engraving, vintage German saxophone

Source: Esalevets Store

The bell engraving alone gives away this horn’s pedigree. The stencil badge and the mountain style peaks are the most common style of D&J engraving.

Dörfler & Jörka, Carl Schiller, tenor saxophone, sax keys, vintage German saxophone

Source: Esalevets Store

In the above photo, the following identifiers all point to this vintage saxophone’s Dörfler & Jörka origins:

Dörfler & Jörka, Carl Schiller, tenor saxophone, sax keys, vintage German saxophone

Source: Esalevets Store

D&J saxophones were copies of JK’s The New Kings and Tonekings. One thing that makes the D&J easily identifiable is their neck fastening screw. While many Dörfler & Jörka saxophones have lost their round thumb screws over the years, this Carl Schiller tenor still has not.

Dörfler & Jörka, Carl Schiller, tenor saxophone, clothes guard, vintage German saxophone

Source: Esalevets Store

The pant guard on this Carl Schiller tenor is classic D&J, as is the immovable, uncomfortable thumb rest. (I have mine padded with a rubber thumb guard.)

The seller of this D&J tenor describes the horn like this:

The instrument is in very good condition. Bell is round and true.

Signed on bell: Carl Schiller. Marked on back: 99 90 / Made in Western Germany.

Comes with a mouthpiece marked: Made in Italy. Also comes with a padded case in very good condition, albeit it does show some exterior wear on the edges..

Here are the remainder of the photos of this vintage, German saxophone, made by Dörfler & Jörka…

Source: Esalevets Store

Finally, it is worth noting that the 9990 serial number fits into the D&J serial numbers that we’ve seen to date. And the Made In Western Germany stamping immediately below the serial number is also what we see on D&J saxophones.

Check out the rest of the D&J stencil horns in my Bassic Sax Pix gallery to compare features and serial numbers. If you are interested in reading more about D&J saxophones, and the company history, be sure to check out the Dörfler & Jörka page on my website. I also have a separate page comparing the measurements of D&J and JK tenor necks.

If you are interested in making this Carl Schiller tenor saxophone your own, you only have a little over a day left. The auction for this D&J stencil horn ends on December 23. The Buy It Now price is $600.00, but the seller is open to offers. At the time of writing there were no offers.

…this is just my blog. My “real” website is www.bassic-sax.info. If you’re looking for sax info, you should check it out too.There’s lots there!

The Mysterious World of Maurice Boiste Saxophones

alto sax, Maurice Boiste, vintage French saxophone,

Paul Beuscher alto, serial # 7125 Source: hostistyle on eBay.com

About two or so years ago, I got an email about what turned out to be a stencil of a Maurice Boiste saxophone. That silver plated, Paul Beuscher alto was a very pretty horn, and at the time was a new one for me. My research at the time was only able to turn up some references to an old page on Saxpics, and according to it, it appeared that the alto was a Pierret stencil.

What a difference a couple of years make. As the Internet has evolved, and as more pages are indexed by both English and foreign language search engines, I am now able to write with 100% certainty that the Paul Beuscher stencil alto was built by Maurice Boiste in his shop near Paris, France.

Who was Maurice Boiste? What kind of saxophones did he build? Sadly, there is very little definitive information available in any language on the ‘Net, and Uwe Ladwig’s history of the saxophone, SAXOFONE – Ein Kompendium, doesn’t mention the brand either.

Thanks to an email I got from my SOTW friend, JayePDX, I finally got around to compiling all the loose bits of research I did have on Maurice Boiste, and conduct some more searches to see what else I could turn up. The result? The new Maurice Boiste page on Bassic Sax.

alto sax, Maurice Boiste, vintage French saxophone, fancy clothes guard,

Paul Beuscher alto, serial # 7125 Source: hostistyle on eBay.com

I’ve managed to find some very interesting bits and pieces of information (mostly in French), about Maurice Boiste, and the saxophones he made. What’s more interesting though, are the saxophones themselves. Although at this point I only have a small sample size, from these 4 horns we can see the evolution that the horns underwent.

The iconic clothes guard was not a feature on all Maurice Boiste horns, but at this time it’s too early to say why. Were the models that didn’t have this funky guard just a plainer model? Or did they come earlier in the development of the brand, and the iconic guard come along at a later date?

The left pinkie cluster is another feature on Maurice Boiste’s horns that showed quite a bit of variance over time, as did the shape of the right pinkie keys. (The two tone horn is alto # 9267, and is likely newer than the Paul Beuscher # 7125 shown above).

If you are interested in this small, French horn manufacturer, check out the Maurice Boiste page on Bassic Sax. If you would like to see all the photos I have of his horns, check out the Maurice Boiste gallery in Bassic Sax Pix.

Lastly, if you have any information about the brand, or a Maurice Boiste saxophone that you would like to contribute to the gallery, please drop me an email. Thank you.

…this is just my blog. My “real” website is www.bassic-sax.info. If you’re looking for sax info, you should check it out too.There’s lots there!