Super Artiste

Super Artiste Alto

Serial #: 1040
Finish: Lacquer

Source: eBay.com

Super Artiste Tenor

Serial #: 1985
Finish: Lacquer

Source: eBay.com

Super Artiste Alto

Serial #: 2360
Finish: Lacquer

Source: eBay.com

Super Artiste Baritone

Serial #: 25XX
Finish: Lacquer

Source: eBay.com

Super Artiste Alto

Serial #: 12708
Finish: Silver plate

Source: eBay.fr

Super Artiste Alto

Serial #: 140XX
Finish: Silver plate

Or this might be nickel plate. It’s hard to tell; the photos are so small.

Source: eBay.pl

Super Artiste 47 Tenor

Serial #?
Finish: Silver plate

I have never seen a Super Artiste with a numeric designation. I don’t know what it means. It is yet another Pierret mystery.

Source: Bo Meyer

Be sure to check the Pierret Gallery on Bassic Sax Pix. Any new Super Artiste photos I come across while be uploaded to there. (And there are lots!)

This model is by far and away the most common Pierret saxophone that appears for sale on the popular online sites. I’ve often wondered why. Did Pierret make more Super Artistes than any other models? I’m guessing they did. We know that the patent for the horn was issued in 1953. Since the company ceased operations in circa. 1972, it’s quite likely that these horns were produced for nearly 20 years.

The other thing I’ve often wondered about, is why is it that so many of these horns—and this question extends to all newer model Pierrets—have been beaten up so badly? Many of them seem to have suffered from bad owners. Did they sell for cheap, so people thought they were junk and thus abused them? I don’t think so. Sure they didn’t sell for the price of a Selmer Mark VI, but come on, what the hell were people thinking? These weren’t cheap, student model horns. These were pro model saxophones. Weird… I don’t get it.

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